HOW TO GROW HIBISCUS

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Native to the warm-temperate, subtropical and tropical regions across the world, Hibiscus species have some of the most exotic flowers of all ornamental, flowering shrubs. While the Chinese hibiscus - Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, with its many showy hybrids, is the world's most popular hibiscus, it is not hardy enough for garden use in temperate climates. Which is why the species and cultivars of the hardy hibiscus - Hibiscus syriacus, are the most commonly grown ornamental species in the cooler northern European climates.


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Hibiscus will grow well and any well-drained, fertile soil. However they will perform best in a neutral to slightly alkaline soil. Plant from October to March in a sheltered position in full sun. Hibiscus are late flowering in temperate climates - usually in succession from July to October - and as such it is advisable to provide them a certain amount of protection (such as a south-facing, sheltered wall) in more northerly gardens.

To encourage a bushy habit young plants can be pruned hard back in late spring. After pruning apply a generous 5-7 cm mulch of well-rotted farm manure or garden compost around the base of the plant but avoid touching the stem. A humus-rich mulch can them be applied annually each spring.

No regular pruning is required, except to remove dead or diseased branches in late winter or early spring. However any long shoots can be shortened after flowering. Note that the flower buds appear on new seasons wood, so while hard pruning will lose the natural shape of the plant it will lead to the production of prolifically flowering side shoots.

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CAN YOU EAT SEA BUCKTHORN BERRIES?


When urban hunter-gatherers have hung up their plastic carrier bags and colanders after the short-lived, free blackberry harvest, those in the know are just ramping up for the next crop of edible berries which are waiting just around the corner.

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Native to the fixed dunes and sea cliffs of Europe and Asia, sea buckthorn is a spiny deciduous shrub often seen planted in coastal regions due to its resistance to salt in both the air and the soil.

While sea buckthorn berries do not look like most of the regular fruits you find in the supermarket you will be please to know that they are indeed edible - despite their particularly sharp flavour. Be that as it may, freshly picked sea buckthorn berries are surprisingly good for you. They contains high levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids and phytosterols which help to reduce LDL cholesterol. Sea buckthorn also has a complete fatty acid profile that includes omega-3, omega-6, omega-7 and omega-9s.

You can pick them straight from the stem, although this can be quite messey and you will have to contend with the thorns (hence the common name). The best way to harvest sea buckthorn berries is to run your fingers among the stem, bursting the berries into a suitable container. Sieve out any skins, leaves or seeds that have made their way into the juice and drink as fresh as you like. However, to make it more palatable and to preserve it in any quantity, you will need to heat the juice with sugar to make a syrup.

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WHERE DO KOALAS LIVE?




Koalas are a native of Australia, predominantly found on the coastal regions of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and parts of South Australia, with the largest concentrations in New South Wales and Victoria.

As recently as a hundred years ago, koalas were widespread in Australia - especially in Victoria and New South Wales.

Where do koala bears live?
Sadly the settlement of these new lands brought about a dramatic decline in the koala population.

Land clearance, often accompanied by burning, destroyed much of their natural habitat and huge numbers of koalas were killed for the fur trade. In 1924, more than two million skins were exported.

Slaughter on this scale came close to wiping out the species. Only a few thousand koalas survived before protective measures were taken.

They are now a protected species with sanctuaries flourishing in Victoria and Queensland. They have been reintroduced into south Australia where they have become locally extinct.

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HOW TO GROW TURNIPS FROM SEED

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The turnip is a bulbous root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates across the world. Unfortunately it is unsuitable for cultivation in warmer climates as the hot temperatures cause the roots to become woody and unpalatable.

While it is best known for its delicately mustard-flavoured roots the tender leaves may also be used as a winter green vegetable. In fact young shoots may be blanched and used as an alternative to sea kale. Luckily turnips can be harvested throughout most of the year so long as you plant a succession of the correct choice of varieties.

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Turnips will perform best in a friable, light loam, but they can be grown in any fertile soil rich in phosphates. Prepare the ground before spring sowing by apply well-rotted farm manure or garden compost over the winter - being careful to dig it in deeply to prevent the roots from forking or producing an earthy flavour when cooked. Then give the ground a top dressing of lime at a rate of 7 oz per square yard on all but limy and chalky soils to reduce the incidence of brassica clubroot. Superphosphate and bone-meal are also valuable additions to the soil and should also be applied before sowing.

If you have a south-facing plot then you can sow turnip seeds in the open in mid-March for an early crop. In colder, northern European regions you will need to protect the seedlings with a cloche against the worst of the cold, wet weather. Later sowings can be made in less sheltered positions. For harvesting during the summer sow turnip seeds in April and again in May, while an autumn and winter harvest you will need to sow in mid-July and late August.

Sow the seeds 1/2 inch deep in drills drawn 12-15 inches apart. Once the seedlings have germinated they can be thinned out. Summer turnips will require approximately one plant for every 6-9 inches while autumn and winter turnips will need 12 inches between plants. Give the young plants a thorough watering once a week during prolonged periods of dry weather.

Harvesting

Summer turnips can be lifted, even from when they are young, as and when they are required. You can leave winter turnips in the ground and harvest them as needed or lift them all in November for storing. Remove all foliage before storing them in a clamp.

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HOW TO GROW BRUGMANSIA FROM CUTTINGS


Brugmansia are arguably amongst the most exotic of all ornamental, flowering plants yet despite their comparative rarity in the United Kingdom they are surprisingly easy to propagate from cuttings. So, as long as you know someone who has a species or cultivar that you are interested in, building up your own collection or just securing that prized specimen is a relatively straightforward affair.

The simple method

If you are lacking any propagation equipment do not despair as you can root brugmansia cuttings in a simple glass of water.

Take a 6-8 inch long cuttings, then remove all of the lower 2/3rds leaves as these will rot if left submerged. Place the cuttings in a glass of water and replace with fresh water every few days.

A soon as the new roots emerge (usually within a couple of weeks) pot the cuttings up into 3 inch pots containing a good quality compost such as John Innes 'No. 2'.

The horticultural method

You can take cuttings from brugmansia throughout most of the growing season but the best results are usually achieved in May. Using a sharp, sterilized blade take 3-4 inch cuttings from young shoots, preferably with a heel removing the bottom 2/3rds leaves and cut in half any large leaves still attached. Make each cut just below a leaf node.

Using 3 inch pots fill with a good quality seed and cutting compost or make you own mis using equal parts by volume fine grade sphagnum moss peat and horticultural sand. You do not need to add rooting hormone powder to the base of the cuttings.

Sink the cutting into the center of the pot approximately 2 inches deep and then gently water in. Then place the pots inside a heated propagator at a temperature of between 15-18 degrees Celsius, making sure that the propagator is well ventilated. If you do not has a propagator then leave the pots on a warm bright windowsill but avoid direct light during the warmest part of the day otherwise the cuttings can dry out. make sure that the compost remains moist but do not allow it to become waterlogged.

Once rooted set the cuttings into 4-5 inch pots containing John Innes 'No2'. Once the root system has established they can be potted on into the next sized container.

Brugmansias will do best planted out in a greenhouse border or placed outside in full sun once the threat of late frosts have passed. Remember to harden off your plans for a week or so before being left outside otherwise they will be at risk of being scorched.

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HOW TO CONTROL POWDERY MILDEW ON COURGETTES

How to control powdery mildew on courgettes





If you have ever grown courgettes before then the chances are that you have already experienced a powdery mildew infection. So prone to infection are some cultivars that the plant's entire foliage can turn silver due to a complete covering of the fungus. While to some this may provide an attractive, ornamental effect, it will seriously reduce the courgette plants ability to produce a crop, and left unchecked can eventually cause the death of the plant.

Of course for future crops you can avoid the heartache of watching your plants succumb by planting mildew resistant cultivars. One of the best performing is courgette ‘Soleil’, but also consider courgette 'Tuscany' and 'Defender'.

Symptoms

As mentioned previously the most striking symptom is the typical powdery-white, or off-white coating which spreads from discrete patches to cover the leaves which eventually take on a characteristic tattered and frayed appearance. Both the blooms and the fruits can also be affected. The incidence of powdery mildew is most prevalent from the end of the summer when the cooler night temperatures following warm dry days and dry soil conditions all favour development of this fungus.

Organic control of powdery mildew

Plant courgette plants in a position of full sun and allow plenty of space between plants to help ensure good ventilation. When you consider that each plant will cover at least 1 square metre then leave at least a metre between plants. Powdery mildew spores will overwinter in the soil, ready to re-infect plants the following year, so avoid planting courgettes in the same position year after year.

Keep the soil moist as water stress with make the plant less able to resist or even cope with the fungus. Remove and burn the worst affected leaves and and any infected leaves that have fallen to the ground. Provide a dry mulch such as bark chips or gravel to help keep moisture in the soil and reduce humidity around the base of the plants.

You can consider applying an organic fungicide such as a proprietary potassium bicarbonate spray, or create your own formula mixing 1 teaspoon of baking soda in two pints of water, with a few drops of olive oil or one made from 40% milk and 60% water.

Chemical control of powdery mildew

If you want to do it 'old-school' then apply copper-based or sulphur-based fungicides. Alternatively treat with myclobutanil based products. Alway read manufacturer's recommendation before application.

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ARUM LILY 20 SEEDS - 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

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The arum lily - Zantedeschia aethiopica, is arguably among the most beautiful and exotic of all hardy, ornamental flowering plants and now you can purchase their seeds at the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop. Native to southern Africa it is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial with arrow shaped dark-green leaves, whose preferred habitat is in, and alongside, streams and ponds.

It is an evergreen plant in its natural habitat where abundant rainfall and warm temperatures remain steady for most of the year. However in the cooler dryer climates of northern Europe it falls into more of a herbaceous lifecycle, losing its foliage during the winter.

Under favourable conditions the arum lily can grow to between 60–100 cm tall when in bloom, and forms large clumps of foliage. Each leaf can be up to 45 cm long. The large pure white flowers are produced in the spring, with additions blooms during the summer and autumn.

Despite their exotic looks the seeds are reasonable easy to germinate. Soak the the seeds in a container of warm water overnight. The next day fill 3 inch pots with a good quality compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Cutting'. Place one seed on the surface of each pot and then give a light dressing of vermiculite as arum lily seeds require the presence of light to help initiate germination. As you would expect from their semi-aquatic life cycle the seeds will need to be watered well and kept moist almost to the point (but not quite) of being waterlogged. Place the container outdoors in an unheated greenhouse. Germination will take between four to 12 weeks.

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HOW TO GROW ZUCCHINI IN POTS

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If you are looking to obtain a regular crop of fresh zucchini, but do not have the appropriate garden space, then growing zucchini in pots may well be the answer you are looking for. So long as you have a spot of ground that receives direct sunlight for a good proportion of the day then it doesn't matter if your garden is a balcony, concreted over, or the pavement outside your property. Just be aware that one courgette plant will spread out to approximately 1 square metre.

To begin with you need a suitable container and when it comes to growing zucchini - the bigger the better. For zucchini you would need one plant in a container approximately 45cm wide and with a volume of about 25 litres. Of course if you need to move the container around at some point then either choose one which can still be carried once full of damp compost or place the container on a set of wheels before planting.

Fill the bottom third of the pot with well-rotted garden of farm manure then top up the rest of the pot with a good quality soil-based compost such as John Innes 'No.3'.

You can obtain zucchini plants by either growing it from seed yourself or by obtaining a seedling purchased from a plant retailer or gardening friend. Plant a zucchini seedling into the centre of the pot once the threat of late frosts have passed and water in. Keep the soil damp, but not waterlogged and feed with a high potash, liquid soluble fertilizer such as a tomato feed every 10-14 days once the first fruits start to swell.

Zucchini will be ready for harvesting once the fruits reach approximately 10-13 cm long. Under favourable conditions you should expect one plant to produce 3-4 zucchinis each week during the cropping season.

Powdery mildew

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Zucchini are fairly straightforward crop although they are often prone to fungal attack from powdery mildew which will reduce cropping. Powdery mildew thrives in warm, humid conditions but luckily there are a number of cultural methods with can be employed to reduce this. Powdery mildew is identified by a covering of white dust on the leaves.

1. Always try to grow zucchini in a well ventilated position

2. Place a dry mulch on the surface of the compost such as gravel or bark chips as this will maintain moisture levels within the compost, reduce weeds and reduce humidity around the plant.

3. Always water directly into the pot and avoid wetting the leaves. Also consider sinking a 15 cm pot alongside the seeding when planting out. Water directly into the pot which will help ensure that water goes right down to the roots and doesn't sit around the neck of the plant, which can lead to rotting.

4. If all else fails you can control powdery mildew with copper-based or sulphur-based fungicides.

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TOP TEN HERBS FOR A HERB GARDEN


With so many different herbs to choose from it can be hard to decide which species to select when first planting up a herb garden. Of course it is only worth growing the types of herbs which you are most likely to use, and this will be dictated by the adventurousness of your culinary skills.

Our more popular herbs have been introduced from a wide range of climates and environments across the globe. Some are small and compact in growth, while others will sprawl across your herb garden smothering all others in its path (yes I am looking at you Mentha species)!

With this in mind I have categorized the following herbs with regards to their environmental requirements. That way you will only have to plant your herb garden once (hopefully) and get a decent crop from all of your plants.

Mediterranean - full sun and poor, free-draining soils

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1. Basil - Believed to have originated from India, basil is now an extremely popular herb in many mediterranean dishes. There are a number of species and selected hybrids but it is the sweet basil which is typically used with Italian food.

It is easy to grow from seed and cultivated as an annual. It is most commonly used fresh in cooked recipes by being added at the last moment. This is because cooking basil will quickly destroys its sweet, anise flavour.

Depending on conditions Basil can grows to a height and spread of between 30–130 cm.

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2. Oregano - Native to warm-temperate western and southwestern Eurasia and the Mediterranean region, oregano is perennial with an aromatic, warm and slightly bitter flavour. Like basil, it is a popular herb in Italian cuisine, but perhaps more so in Italian-American cuisine as a result of soldiers returning with it from World War II who enjoyed its characteristic 'pizza' flavour.

Dried leaves have more flavour than fresh, and good quality oregano can be strong enough to almost numb the tongue. In cooler. northern European climates oregano may not survive the freezing winters and so may need to be planted with new stock each spring.

Depending on conditions oregano can grow to a height and spread of between 50–100 cm.

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3. Parsley - Native to the central Mediterranean region, parsley is widely used in Middle Eastern, European, and American cooking. Most often seen as a garnish (usually as curly-leaf parsley), the roots are also widely used in central and eastern European cuisines as a snack or a vegetable in soups, stews, and casseroles.

In temperate climates parsley is a bright green, biennial, plant, but acts as an annual herb in subtropical and tropical regions. It will grow to an ultimate height and spread of between 10-50 cm. Parsley will perform best in a moist, well-drained soil, in full sun to semi-shade.

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4. Sage - Also native to the Mediterranean region, the common or garden sage is a perennial, evergreen subshrub which is cultivated for the savory, slightly peppery flavour of its new leaves. It is used in many European cuisines and is traditionally served as sage and onion stuffing - an accompaniment to roast turkey or chicken at Christmas or Thanksgiving Day. Other dishes include pork casserole, Sage Derby cheese and Lincolnshire sausages.

Sage will grow best in a light, moist, but well-drained soil in full sun. In colder, northern European countries it will need to be planted in a sheltered position that avoids becoming overly wet during the winter. You can expect sage to grow to an ultimate height and spread of between 50-100 cm.

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5. Thyme - Native to southern Europe from the western Mediterranean to southern Italy, the common thyme is a bushy, woody-based evergreen subshrub with small, highly aromatic leaves. The intensely pungent flavour will complement most meats, including chicken and game, and it is a good complement to slow-cooked dishes such as stews and daubes. It is one of the herbs used in bouquet garni, along with parsley and bay. Thyme is used both fresh and dried, but while the freshly picked leaves are more flavoursome they will only last a week or two under refrigeration. However thyme leaves will keep their flavour for many months if carefully frozen

Thyme is easy to grow in the majority of well-drained alkaline to neutral soils in a position that receives as much direct sunlight as possible. In favourable conditions thyme will grow to an overall height and spread of between 10 and 50 cm.

European - full sun, rich, moist but free-draining soils

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6. Chives - Chives are a commonly found herb in western cuisine and used to add flavour to fish, potatoes, soups and other dishes. Nature to much of Europe, Asia and North America, it is a perennial herb which will thrive in well-drained and slightly alkaline soils that are rich in organic matter. They will perform best in full sun.

In colder, northern European regions, the foliage die back to the underground bulbs during the winter, with the new growth emerging in early spring. When harvesting, the stalks should be cut to the base, but only harvest what you will immediately use. During the growing season, the plant will continually regrow leaves, allowing for a continuous harvest. However once the plants start to look old they can be cut back to about 2–5 cm above ground level.

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7. Coriander - otherwise known as cilantro, coriander is an annual herb grown for its roots, seeds and foliage. Native to a wide area of Western Asia and southern Europe, coriander can grow to a height and spread of between 50–100 cm. Grow it in a fertile, well drained soil in full sun, especially when they are grown for seeds. For leaf production it will be better off grown in partial shade.

The leaves have a different taste from the seeds and are an ingredient in many Indian, Chinese and Thai dishes as well as being a popular flavouring in Mexican cooking. Like basil, heat causes coriander leaves to lose their flavour, and so are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. The leaves are prone to turn quickly once removed from the plant, and will lose their aroma even when freshly dried or frozen.

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8. Mint - There are a number of popular mints species that can be grown in the garden but arguably the most popular is Spearmint - Mentha spicata. Native to much of Europe and Asia, it is a herbaceous, rhizomatous, perennial plant which will grow to an approximate height of 30cm with a spread of 100 cm. The leaves of spearmint are used to make mint sauce (the ideal accompaniment to roast lamb), added to boiled new potatoes and peas, to make mint jelly or to garnish summer drinks.

Spearmint prefers partial shade, but can flourish in a range of conditions from full sun to full shade. It is best suited to loamy soils which have had plenty of organic material previously dug in.

Asian - warm temperatures, direct sun and moist soils

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9. Dill - The fern-like, aromatic leaves of dill are a widely used in European and central Asian cuisine. It is used to flavour many foods such as fish dishes, borscht and other soups, as well as pickles. Dill is best when used fresh as it will quickly lose its flavour when dried. Freeze-dried dill leaves, however, can retain their flavour for several months.

Native to south-west Asia, dill can be grown from seed easily in regions which experience warm to hot summers in a position which receives as much direct sunlight as possible. Be aware that even partial shade will reduce the yield substantially. It also prefers a rich, well drained soil.

Given favorable conditions you can expect dill to grow to between 50-100 cm with an approximate spread of 10-50 cm.

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10. Tarragon - Tarragon is hardy perennial, cultivated for its aromatic leaves and is popular through the western world for flavouring chicken, fish and egg dishes. Tarragon is also the main flavour of BĂ©arnaise sauce. There are a number of cultivars available but it is generally believed that French tarragon is the best for culinary use.

Native across much of Eurasia and North America, it will grow best in a hot, sunny spot in a moist but well-drained soil. Avoid overwatering as this will damage the roots. Under favourable conditions you can expect tarragon to grow to 50-100 cm high with a spread of 10-50 cm

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HOW TO GROW COURGETTES IN CONTAINERS

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If you have a passion for freshly grown produce, but are restricted on garden space, then all is not lost. Growing edible plants in containers has not only be proven to be an effective and space-saving method of production, so long as you have an area which receives a good amount of sunlight then anyone can grow edible crops at home.

As luck would have it courgettes are an excellent choice for growing in containers due to their continuous cropping. In fact one plant will easily produce enough courgettes for a two person household so long as you keep harvesting the fruits at their optimum time. The only real downside with growing courgettes is their susceptibility to powdery mildew, but this can be controlled with copper-based or sulphur-based fungicides.

To begin with you will need a container of at least 18 inches wide and approximately 25 litres in volume - the bigger the better! Fill the bottom third of the container with well-rotted farm manures and the rest with a good quality soil-based compost such as John Innes 'No 3'.

To make a head start on the season you can sow your courgette seed under protection inside in March and April. Using 3 inch pots containing John Innes 'Seed and Cutting' sow one seed per pot no more than 1 cm deep. Place the pots inside a heated propagator at a temperature of between 20-25 Celsius and keep on a warm, bright windowsill, but one that does not receive direct sunlight. If you do not have a heated propagator then seal the pots inside a clear polythene bag.

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You can expect the seedlings to emerge in 7-10 days at which point they can be removed from the propagator or bag. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged and as the seedlings mature will need to potted on into 10 cm pots. Once the threat of late frosts have passed the seedlings can be hardened off before planting outside into their container.

You can plant courgette seed directly into their containers during May and June, but again only once the threat of late frosts have passed. Germination will usually take about 8 – 18 days.

Place your container in a sunny, warm position and place a layer of dry mulch (bark chips or gravel) on the surface. Continue to keep the compost moist and do not allow it to dry out - particularly in hot dry weather.

As soon as the courgettes begin to form begin to feed with a liquid soluble fertilizer every 10-14 days.

Courgettes will be ready to harvest as so as they are 6″ long by cutting them off at the stalk with a sharp knife.

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